Wine Stories Jessica Bordoni

Chianti “once upon a time”, by Diego Finocchi at L’Erta di Radda

Chianti “once upon a time”, by Diego Finocchi at L’Erta di Radda

“My passion for viticulture was born within, it doesn’t run in my family. My parents own a wood furniture company.” Thus declares the humble Diego Finocchi, the heart and soul of the L’Erta di Radda winery, founded in Radda in Chianti in 2009. The poetic name (“erta” means steep slope) lends directly to the winery’s topography: the cellar is found along a dramatically steep road that leads to the center of the typical Sienese hamlet.

Three hectares for yourself

Class of 1982, Diego’s career in wine began when he enrolled in the University of Viticulture and Enology in Florence while simultaneously working at various cellars in the area. He landed as Production Manager at Castello di Radda. “It was 2006, I was 24 years old and I only had a few exams left when I was given the opportunity to buy 3 hectares of vines. I didn’t think twice, even if it meant forfeiting my current role at Castello di Radda, which I truly loved, and which had allowed me to grow professionally.”

The first bottles of 2009

With a small loan and a remarkable will to succeed, Diego steered towards realizing his greatest dream: having a winery all of his own. In the first three years, he concentrated his efforts on the vineyards. “At first, I decided to focus on consigning grapes and selling bulk wine, working with important names like Marchesi Antinori and Frescobaldi.” 2009 marked the first year of production for Diego Finocchi’s Chianti Classico L’Erta di Radda, and in 2012 Il Bianco dell’Erta di Radda was released, a white Igt Toscana made from Trebbiano and Malvasia.

Focused on Chianti Classico

“Chianti Classico is without a doubt the most important label within my portfolio. The vinification is traditional: fermentation of Sangiovese and Canaiolo that lasts between 10 and 15 days, with delestage, pumpovers and punchdowns, without the addition of yeasts. The maceration is somewhere between 25 and 30 days, and the malolactic fermentation takes place partially in barrel and partially in stainless steel. The wine finishes in used French oak, second passage, for 10 months.”

 

 

Organic wines that speak to the territory

Most of the vineyards date back to the late 1960s, with plants lending fairly low yields. The total surface area is five hectares – between old and new vines – of which over 90% is Sangiovese. “I use only the Guyot training system for my vines, which in my opinion is the most respectful to the plants and their cycle of life.” Since 2015, the wines are all labeled and certified organic. “My goal is to makes wines that are as faithful as possible to the territory. Sangiovese from Radda is marked with finesse and beautiful acidity, while the marl (“galestro”) terrain imparts freshness.”

Chianti “once upon a time”

The range of wines also includes Il Rosso Com’era. “This bottle is a tribute to the ancient tradition of Chianti Classico, whose original recipe called for the use of both red grapes and white grapes. The wine Com’era – which means, “as it was” – is a blend of Sangiovese, Canaiolo, and 10% white grapes. Today the Chianti Classico regulations don’t allow for the incorporation of white varietals, so the bottle is labeled Toscana Igt.”

 

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