News Alessandro Torcoli

The new Prunotto cellar has opened in Bussia

The new Prunotto cellar has opened in Bussia

Prunotto’s history is about families, from the Prunotto family that founded it in 1904, to the Colla family that developed it, up until the takeover by the Antinori family in 1994. On 20th June, we celebrated 50 years of the flagship wine of the estate, Barolo Bussia, with Albiera Antinori, president both of Prunotto and Marchesi Antinori. The first vintage was one of the most famous of the twentieth century: 1961. For the occasion, the Antinoris inaugurated the renovated cellar in Bussia, designed by the Architect Paolo Cattaneo from Turin, also famous for designing the new face of the legendary restaurant Al Cambio in Piedmont’s regional capital.

 

 

Tradition and design in the new Prunotto cellar

Built preserving the oldest parts dating back to the nineteenth century, the farmstead is a typical Langhe building, with beautiful frescoed ceilings, floors made of local materials, interior doors, windows and wooden shutters. The ageing cellar is derived from the existing one, with exposed-brick vaults. The fermentation cellar is below the terrace, where you can enjoy a breathtaking view of the surrounding Monforte d’Alba, Barolo and La Morra vineyards. On the ground floor, there is the ageing cellar with the 32-hectolitre French and Slavonian oak barrels. There is a touch of contemporary design alongside tradition and, in the more modern part, a shop and tasting room for visitors has been opened.

 

 

The Bussia and Vigna Colonnello 2011 to taste

Two Bussia wines tasted, the cru and super cru, i.e. the Vigna Colonnello 2011, with a south-western exposure, 35-40-year-old plants, and a very varied soil composition (10% sand, 40% silt and 50% clay). This latter wine is a masterpiece of elegance and energy, whose long future you can see when tasting it today. It has an intriguing bouquet of penia (a sweet bread) and pomegranate, a touch of tender green leaves, probably derived from the partial use of stems in vinification, and a trace of citrus fruit typical of loose, sandy soils, such as the one at Colonello. Also the Barolo Bussia 2011 is excellent, already open and outgoing, with a touch of spice and hints of roasted coffee alongside small delicate raspberries and typical notes of roses.

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